Print 

Author Topic: Mind-share  (Read 3428 times)

Offline Tanxs1

  • Posts Too Much
  • *****
  • Posts: 3165
  • There there, it's ok....
    • Hehehehehe...
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2011, 09:50:17 AM »
No  Kiwi :P. The first few numbers are similiar tho.

If I remember correctly, the Fibonacci numbers are:

1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 45, 79, 123, 202, 325, 527, 852 etc. etc.

Each number is the addition of the two numbers before it, where at the start it is just one because there is nothing to add. I typed out all of them without the use of a calculator! :D

I feel smart :).

Ya... when I was liek 9 I read a book on it. It had pictures of bunnies, ok?


Offline BFM_three60

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 6846
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2011, 11:22:58 AM »
Your calculator phails, it's:

0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 144 233 377 610 etc.

Every 15th number in the Fibonacci sequence ends in 0.

(The first 0 is the 0th Fibonacci number, so you can ignore it.)
Check out my Short introduction... corner and my "Historical figures who should perhaps be better-known" thread!!

Exciting videos: 1.1 / 1.2 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6



               

Offline BFM_Kiwi

  • Major
  • *
  • Posts: 9154
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2011, 12:57:30 PM »

I know it's not fibonacci which is probably why I said sorta, kinda and almost :P




(thanks TrkKing)


Offline Lucky

  • Posts Too Much
  • *****
  • Posts: 2659
  • Just do what makes you happy. JKLOL
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2011, 01:36:01 PM »
England is old and small, so in the Middle Ages they started running out of places to bury people. So, they would dig up coffins and would take their bones to a house and re-use the grave. In reopening these coffins, one out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on their wrist and lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night to listen for the bell. Hence on the ‘graveyard shift’ they would know that someone was ‘saved by the bell’, or he was a ‘dead ringer’.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2011, 01:39:11 PM by BFM_Lucky »


Offline Tanxs1

  • Posts Too Much
  • *****
  • Posts: 3165
  • There there, it's ok....
    • Hehehehehe...
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2011, 01:39:37 PM »
21 + 34 isn't 45, Tanxs  :doh:.

I wouldn't use a calculator for that :P. Simple error that messed everything up ^_^.


Offline BFM_three60

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 6846
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2011, 03:25:33 PM »
England is old and small, so in the Middle Ages they started running out of places to bury people. So, they would dig up coffins and would take their bones to a house and re-use the grave. In reopening these coffins, one out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on their wrist and lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night to listen for the bell. Hence on the ‘graveyard shift’ they would know that someone was ‘saved by the bell’, or he was a ‘dead ringer’.

A little learning is a dangerous thing...

"Saved by the bell" is a boxing idiom.

"Dead ringer" comes from horse racing - one horse would be swapped for another, similar-looking, one just before the race.

"Graveyard shift" comes from the US and has nothing to do with listening to bells.

All three of these come from the US originally anyway.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/saved-by-the-bell.html
« Last Edit: January 26, 2011, 03:46:54 AM by BFM_three60 »
Check out my Short introduction... corner and my "Historical figures who should perhaps be better-known" thread!!

Exciting videos: 1.1 / 1.2 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6



               

Offline BFM_Marty

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 1565
  • A tip o't hat to you!
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #21 on: January 26, 2011, 01:37:18 AM »
England is old and small, so in the Middle Ages they started running out of places to bury people. So, they would dig up coffins and would take their bones to a house and re-use the grave. In reopening these coffins, one out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on their wrist and lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night to listen for the bell. Hence on the ‘graveyard shift’ they would know that someone was ‘saved by the bell’, or he was a ‘dead ringer’.

And I'm not certain about re-using graves either...see, at various local churchyards you can see that the church has stonework that has been covered by the ground. Your first conclusion might be that the foundations weren't very good so the building is sinking.

However, it appears that the reason why the ground is higher is because there have been so many bodies buried that the ground has actually been raised by the number of graves.

Quote from: Bill Bryson: 'At Home'
[while touring a small church in Norfolk]

"...it isn't because the church is sinking...How many people do you suppose are buried here?"

I glanced appraisingly at the gravestones and said, "I don't know. Eighty? A hundred?"

"I think that's probably a bit of an underestimate...A country parish likes this has an average of 250 people in it, which translates into roughly a thousand adult deaths per century, plus a few thousand more poor souls that never reached maturity. Multiply that by the number of centuries the church has been here and what you have is...probably something more like twenty thousand...That's a lot of mass...It's why the ground has risen three feet...There are a thousand parishes in Norfolk...From here you can see into perhaps ten or twelve other parishes, so you are probably looking at roughly a quarter million burials...in a place that has never been anything but quiet and rural, where nothing much has ever happened."


Click on the Europe sig to get the link and image code.

Applied for BFM: 28th August 2008
Received Ventrilo: 27th October 2008
Received Little Tags (bfm_): 25th December 2008
Received Big Tags (BFM_): 24th March 2009
Received Corporal Rank: 1st September 2009
Stepped Down From Corporal: 16th March 2010
Nothing happened: 15th July 2012



@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

For a US or UK flag, go to >>THIS THREAD<< and quote the whole code. Quote, not copy.

Offline BFM_three60

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 6846
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #22 on: January 26, 2011, 04:00:22 AM »
England is old and small, so in the Middle Ages they started running out of places to bury people. So, they would dig up coffins and would take their bones to a house and re-use the grave. In reopening these coffins, one out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on their wrist and lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night to listen for the bell. Hence on the ‘graveyard shift’ they would know that someone was ‘saved by the bell’, or he was a ‘dead ringer’.

In fact this is the 11th point of an internet essay from 1999, called "Life in the 1500s", about English History and idioms connected with it. It is almost 100% wrong. It is also written by an American who, presumably, was just having a laugh - since it was written in April, and probably April 1st. Almost all the phrases in it come from much later and from the US.
 
Check out my Short introduction... corner and my "Historical figures who should perhaps be better-known" thread!!

Exciting videos: 1.1 / 1.2 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6



               

Offline Lucky

  • Posts Too Much
  • *****
  • Posts: 2659
  • Just do what makes you happy. JKLOL
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2011, 05:14:28 AM »
England is old and small, so in the Middle Ages they started running out of places to bury people. So, they would dig up coffins and would take their bones to a house and re-use the grave. In reopening these coffins, one out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on their wrist and lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night to listen for the bell. Hence on the ‘graveyard shift’ they would know that someone was ‘saved by the bell’, or he was a ‘dead ringer’.

A little learning is a dangerous thing...

"Saved by the bell" is a boxing idiom.

"Dead ringer" comes from horse racing - one horse would be swapped for another, similar-looking, one just before the race.

"Graveyard shift" comes from the US and has nothing to do with listening to bells.

All three of these come from the US originally anyway.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/saved-by-the-bell.html

Sorry I don't trust UK sites.


Offline BFM_three60

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 6846
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #24 on: April 06, 2011, 04:36:52 AM »
Did you know that, if you ever want to work out how many seconds there are in a year without using a calculator, just tell whichever nub is asking you that (look it up, sheesh!) that it's "pi"*107? Pi as in 3.14159265358979323...

This is bizarrely a seriously good approximation, giving you an answer of 31,415,927 seconds when the "real" answer is closer to 31,557,000 seconds. But it's a very good approximation and even has the advantage of possible cancelling out with any other pi you may have in the sum.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2011, 02:41:48 AM by BFM_three60 »
Check out my Short introduction... corner and my "Historical figures who should perhaps be better-known" thread!!

Exciting videos: 1.1 / 1.2 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6



               

Offline Tanxs1

  • Posts Too Much
  • *****
  • Posts: 3165
  • There there, it's ok....
    • Hehehehehe...
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #25 on: April 06, 2011, 07:18:00 AM »
Did you know that, if you ever want to work out how many seconds there are in a year without using a calculator, just tell whichever nub is asking you that (look it up, sheesh!) that it's "pi"*107? Pi as in 3.14159265358979323...

This is bizarrely a seriously good approximation, giving you an answer of 31,415,927 seconds when the "real" answer is closer to 31,557,000 seconds. But it's a very good approximation and even has the advantage of possible cancelling out with any other pi you may have in the sum.

60x60x60x24x365 (assuming not a leap year) would be correct... wouldn't it three60? *Confused face*



Offline BFM_three60

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 6846
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2011, 08:33:23 AM »
Yes, that's roughly it. Though it's better to do 3600*24*365.2425 since that's closer to how long a year really lasts. Since not that many of us can do this in our head, it's nice to have a seriously easy-to-recall value that's accurate to about 99% without having to do any calculation whatsoever!
Check out my Short introduction... corner and my "Historical figures who should perhaps be better-known" thread!!

Exciting videos: 1.1 / 1.2 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6



               

Offline Trael

  • Senior Poster
  • ****
  • Posts: 892
  • Hi Ho I live in a box...
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2011, 08:52:05 PM »
Did you know 60% of the 'junk' under your fingernails if feces? Gotta wash your hands  :siderofl: with this gross fact.

Offline BFM_three60

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 6846
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #28 on: June 23, 2011, 03:04:17 PM »
It's very important to have a lot of sleep, obviously. Teenagers suffer from sleeplessness a lot, not just because of the strange hours they keep... but also because it's just part of growing up - they need a fair amount of sleep still and yet feel less tired at night than they ought to.

It's a serious problem and one we should all make sure we're addressing, that we are getting enough sleep. For those of you who drive it's particularly important, because if you are slightly sleepy behind the wheel one study suggests that this makes you 2.1 times more likely to have an accident.

So go to bed when your Mum tells you to! It's for your own good.
Check out my Short introduction... corner and my "Historical figures who should perhaps be better-known" thread!!

Exciting videos: 1.1 / 1.2 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6



               

Offline BFM_Marty

  • BFM Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 1565
  • A tip o't hat to you!
Re: Mind-share
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2011, 04:45:12 AM »
It's very important to have a lot of sleep, obviously. Teenagers suffer from sleeplessness a lot, not just because of the strange hours they keep... but also because it's just part of growing up - they need a fair amount of sleep still and yet feel less tired at night than they ought to.

Confusingly, each successive scientific report on the amount of sleep that is best for you produces different results. Until about five years ago, the recommended amount of sleep was about 8hrs a day. Recent studies indicate that 7hrs a day is the ideal amount, and that any more than 8 is detrimental to your health.


Click on the Europe sig to get the link and image code.

Applied for BFM: 28th August 2008
Received Ventrilo: 27th October 2008
Received Little Tags (bfm_): 25th December 2008
Received Big Tags (BFM_): 24th March 2009
Received Corporal Rank: 1st September 2009
Stepped Down From Corporal: 16th March 2010
Nothing happened: 15th July 2012



@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

For a US or UK flag, go to >>THIS THREAD<< and quote the whole code. Quote, not copy.

Print